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I need a summary statement of the quantitative portfolio for paper below. Suici

I need a summary statement of the quantitative portfolio for paper below.
Suici

I need a summary statement of the quantitative portfolio for paper below.
Suicide Prevention Interventions for LGBTQ+ Youth: A Quantitative Research Portfolio
NURS 804: Scholarly Inquiry for Advanced Nursing
October 10, 2023
Suicide Prevention Interventions for LGBTQ+ Youth: A Quantitative Research Portfolio
Introduction
Health Problem
Healthy People 2030 identified reduction in suicidal thoughts among lesbian, gay, or bisexual high school students and reduction in suicidal thoughts among transgender students as important mental health objectives for the American population (Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 2020).
Suicide is an increasing public health problem in the United States. An estimated 12.1% of adolescents contemplate suicide, 4.0% make a plan, and 4.1% make an attempt (Nock et al., 2013). Furthermore, LGBTQ+ adolescents and young adults report higher rates of suicidality than their heterosexual and cisgender peers (James et al., 2016).
Young people in the developmental phase of their sexual identity are most at risk for increased suicidal ideation and behaviors compared to their non-LBGTQ+ counterparts (Kirchner et al., 2022).
Scoping question
What treatment interventions have been effective in preventing suicidal ideation/suicidal behavior among LGBTQ+ youth in the United States?
Population: LGBTQ+ Youth
Concept: Suicidal ideation/suicidal behavior
Context: United States
Summary of findings
The common theme throughout is support and belonging. Support systems and a feeling of belonging reduce mental stress and help lower suicidal ideation and/or suicide.
Annotated Bibliography
Green, A. E., Price, M. N., & Dorison, S. H. (2021). Cumulative minority stress and suicide risk
among LGBTQ youth. American Journal of Community Psychology, 69(1–2), 157–168. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajcp.12553
The authors’ hypothesis is that young people who identify as LGBTQ, transgender, nonbinary, or non-monosexual have a better chance to be susceptible to cumulative minority stress. LGBTQ youth were drafted from ads on social media sites to demonstrate how cumulative risk (multiple negative experiences) contribute and inflate suicidal ideation and or suicide attempts. Through a cross sectional survey information containing: race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, housing instability, perceived discrimination, physical harm/threats due to LGBTQ identity, conversion attempts by caregivers, and attempted suicide were collected then given numerical value. Analysis conducted in SPSS statistics that produced a cumulative risk score by adding the number of stress indicators. The data indicates that the greater number of LGBTQ related minority stress risk factors the higher the chance of suicide attempts (Green et al., 2021). With these findings the authors discuss the need for policies that disallow discrimination and victimization against LGBTQ + persons. The need for more interventions like the “Family Acceptance Project” which displays how rejection affects LGBTQ youth and how to support their LGBTQ children to lesson minority risks which leads to better outcomes (Green et al., 2021).
Hatchel, T., Merrin, G. J., & Espelage, and D. (2018). Peer victimization and suicidality among
LGBTQ youth: The roles of school belonging, self-compassion, and parental support. Journal of LGBT Youth, 16(2), 134–156.https://doi.org/10.1080/19361653.2018.1543036
The aim of this study was to see a correlation, of which support, or bullying between family, and peers, can lead to suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts among LGBTQ youth. Data was collected using surveys from students in Dane County Wisconsin, whom ranged in ages from 14-18 years, and displayed results for: suicidal ideation, school belonging, self-compassion, and parental support (Hatchel et al., 2018). When looking at the youth population findings such as peer victimization were significantly high and were seen as a substantial topic for cause. It was found in the study the prominence of sexual minority youth as well as transgender youth being significantly greater in suicide attempts and ideation compared to their heterosexual peers. Looking at factors such as school belonging, self-compassion and parental support in terms of physiological behaviors were key factors in preventive measures. Parental support and school belonging amongst this population was also found to be beneficial factor to a child’s wellbeing, creating better mental health habits and reducing risk of self harm. Altogether the study suggested the more emotional support a child in the LGTBQ community had along with decrease peer victimization there were more effective measures to be taken in behavior and ideations of suicide (Hatchel et al., 2018).
Kirchner, S., Till, B., Plöderl, M., & Niederkrotenthaler, T. (2022). Effects of “it gets better” suicide prevention videos on youth identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or other sexual or gender minorities: A randomized controlled trial. LGBT Health, 9(6), 436–446. https://doi-org.rlib.pace.edu/10.1089/lgbt.2021.0383
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of “It Gets Better” videos on the suidical ideation of LGBTQ+ youth. A double-blind randomized control trial was conducted on-site in Vienna, Austria and online in German-language settings (Germany and Austria). LGBTQ+ youth (N=483, 14-22 years) would choose whether they wanted to watch a video featuring a girl (Alice) or a boy (Rudi), and then they were randomly assigned into an “It Gets Better” Project Group (n=242) and a control group (n=241). The content of control videos focused on promoting a healthy lifestyle and were not related to coming out difficulties. The primary outcome, suicidal ideation, was assessed using the 32-item reasons for living inventory-Adolescents. The secondary outcomes were help seeking, sexual identity, mood, and hopelessness. These were assessed using the General Help-Seeking Questionnaire, the Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Identity Scale, the mood subscale, and the Beck Hopelessness Scale, respectively. Data measures were collected before randomization, after watching the video, and 4 weeks ater watching. The study found no significant effect of It Gets Better videos on suicidal ideation. However, help-seeking intentions increased after exposure to the video compared wo the control video. This study has some limitations. The sample of German and Austrian youth may not be generalizable to the American LGBTQ+ youth population. This study also experienced a large loss of participants at the 4-week follow-up phase. Despite these limitations, the study was included because double blind RCTs are one of the strongest levels of evidence. This study yields a highly feasible intervention that can be disseminated widely among TV and social media platforms and effect far reaching outcomes in help-seeking behavior among LGBTQ+ youth in crisis that might not be reached otherwise.
Price, M. N., Green, A. E., DeChants, J. P., & Davis, C. K. (2023). Physical dating violence victimization among LGBTQ youth: Disclosure and association with mental health. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 38(15–16), 9059–9085. https://doi.org/10.1177/08862605231162655
The study aims to recognize a connection between physical dating violence and the mental health of LGBTQ youth. Physical dating violence is an increasing concern, especially among LGBTQ youth. Data was collected and analyzed in SSPS Statistics 28 and chi-square analysis to ascertain the measure of physical dating violence throughout all variables (Price et al., 2023). Though dating violence happens within heterosexual relationships the greater risks involve the LGBTQ minority, especially transgender and nonbinary youth. LGBTQ + youth who reported multiple acts of violence against them have substantially greater mental health indicators and almost 50% higher rates of suicide attempts compared to the same group without violence or just a single act of violence (Price et al., 2023). Given the junction of dating violence and the risk of suicide within the LGBTQ youth, the authors state a need for prevention organizations, shelters that can be a safe haven for domestic violence, and law enforcement who are sensitive to the experience of dating violence in this particular group (Price et al., 2023).
Rhoades, H., Rusow, J. A., Bond, D., Lanteigne, A., Fulginiti, A., & Golbach, J. T. (2018). Homelessness, mental health and suicidality among LGBTQ youth accessing crisis services. Child Psychiatry & Human Development, 49(4) 643-651. https://doi.org/10.1007s10578-018-0780-1
The aim of the study was to better understand LGBTQ youth, homelessness, parental rejection, access of crisis service and suicidality. This research analyzed the impact of LGBTQ identity disclosure on family rejection, mental health, and homelessness among youth using an LGBTQ suicide crisis program. Numerous youth report lifetime experiences of homelessness or housing instability. Youth using crisis services who expressed their LGBTQ identity to parents, who then rejected them, reported increased lifetime lifetime homelessness. Experiences of homelessness were linked to increased symptoms of mental health issues, and heightened suicidality. In order to effectively address mental health condition symptoms, suicide, and homelessness, the authors recommend that youth-focused LGBTQ crisis services consider assessing homelessness and using the data, aid in planning for safety and assistance for vulnerable youth (Rhoades et al., 2018).
Russon et al. (2022) Implementing attachment-based family therapy for depressed and suicidal adolescents and young adults in LGBTQ+ services: Feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness. Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention, 43(6), 500–507. https://doi-org.rlib.pace.edu/10.1027/0227-5910/a000821
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness, acceptability and feasibility of Attachment Based Family Therapy in LGBTQ+ community settings. The study enrolled ten participants and a family member/caregiver in 16 weeks of ABFT sessions across three LGBTQ+ organizations located in Atlantic City. Inclusion criteria consisted of clinical levels of suicidal ideation and moderate depression. For this study, clinical levels of suicidal ideation are defined as having a score of 31 or higher on the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire-JR and moderate depression is defined as having a score of 21 or higher on the Beck Depression Inventory-II. The secondary measure, acceptability of treatment, was measured with the Working Alliance Inventory and the nopinions about treatment. Exclusion criteria included (a) endorsing significant impairment from psychosis, (b) endorsing an intellectual and/or developmental disability or had borderline intellectual functioning, (c) endorsing urgent substance use treatment needs (dependency), or (d) unable to speak or read English. ABFT was demonstrated as a feasible and effective intervention for suicide prevention in LBGTQ+ youth. Results showed more than half (55%) of participating youth (n=9) no longer endorsed severe suicidal ideation at the end of treatment, and one youth reported full recovery. Decreases in depression were not statistically significant. Retention rates were high, with all families completing 16 weeks of treatment. Youth and their cargeivers reported high WAI and OAT scores, indicating high rates of acceptability of treatment. This study had several limitations. The sample size was very small and limited to Atlantic City. It had no control group for comparison of treatment effectiveness. ABFT effectiveness may have been influenced by additional treatment that participants recieved outside of the study. Finally, one of the authors of the study, Dr. Guy Diamond, is the developer of ABFT and receives minor royalty payments from the sale of his book (ABFT manual). Despite these limitations, the article was included because it demonstrated a potentially effective intervention that can be widely used among individual therapy sessions. The study suggests a need for a larger trial on the effectiveness of ABFT as a promising suicide prevention intervention among LGBTQ+ youth.
Semborski, S., Srivastava, A., Rhoades, H., Fulginiti, A., & Goldbach, J. T. (2021). Burden,
belonging, and homelessness: Disclosure and social network differences among LGBTQ youth recruited from a suicide crisis service provider. Journal of Homosexuality, 69(5), 894–910. https://doi.org/10.1080/00918369.2021.1898801
The aim of this study was to explore the connections between family/social networks, and thoughts of thwarted belonging and perceived burdensomeness. The Interpersonal Theory of Suicide (ITS) suggests these two feelings heighten the risk of suicide and are at a higher risk for LGBTQ youth than their heterosexual counterparts (Semborski et al., 2021). The authors use data collected from LGBTQ youth that have contacted suicide crisis services. Individuals were asked to participate in a survey to take part in the study. The survey was a short version of the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire (INQ-10), and other figures for age, race, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, homelessness history, and network of family friends and romantic partner (Semborski et al., 2021). Bivariate and multi-variate analysis were conducted to attain the significance of the findings. Youth that have an poor relationship with parents because of their LGBTQ staus are at higher risk of homelessness and suicidal ideation. The study shows that having a supportive network exhibits a reduction in thwarted belonging and perceived burdensomeness, as well as preventing mental anguish and suicidal ideation (Semborski et al., 2021).
CASP Tool
Section A: Are the results valid?
Did the study address a clearly focused issue? (Yes/No/Can’t Tell) Explain:
The study addresses clearly focused issues. The primary objective of the study was to investigate the potential influence of school belonging, self-compassion, and parental support on the relationship between peer victimization and suicidality in a sizable sample of LGBTQ youth exclusively (Hatchel et al., 2018). Additionally, they aimed to explore the distinctions in these factors concerning both thoughts of suicide and actual suicide attempts. They believe their findings will be a distinctive and original contribution to the current literature on suicide among LGBTQ youth.
Was the cohort recruited in an acceptable way? (Yes/No/Can’t Tell) Explain:
Was the exposure accurately measured to minimize bias? (Yes/No/Can’t Tell) Explain:
Was the outcome accurately measured to minimize bias? (Yes/No/Can’t Tell) Explain:
(a) Have the authors identified all important confounding factors? (Yes/No/Can’t Tell) Explain:
(b) Have they taken account of the confounding factors in the design and/or analysis? (Yes/No/Can’t Tell) Explain:
(a) Was the follow up of subjects complete enough? (Yes/No/Can’t Tell) Explain:
(b) Was the follow up of subjects long enough? (Yes/No/Can’t Tell) Explain:
Section B: What are the results?
What are the results of this study? Summarize the results:
How precise are the results? Interpret the precision measures:
Do you believe the results? (Yes/No/Can’t Tell) Explain:
Section C: Will the results help locally?
Can the results be applied to the local population? (Yes/No/Can’t Tell) Explain:
Do the results of this study fit with other available evidence? (Yes/No/Can’t Tell) Explain:
What are the implications of this study for practice? (Yes/No/Can’t Tell) Explain:
Referring to your textbook – what is the Level of Evidence for this study? Explain:
Conclusion
As the studies have presented, there is a great need to provide more support and resources for our LGBTQ youth. Suicide amongst this group is highly prevalent and a public health crisis. Practioners should have a better understanding of causality to combact these suicidal ideations and help facilitate a healthy outlook and mental well-being.
References
Green, A. E., Price, M. N., & Dorison, S. H. (2021). Cumulative minority stress and suicide risk
among LGBTQ youth. American Journal of Community Psychology, 69(1–2), 157–168. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajcp.12553
Hatchel, T., Merrin, G. J., & Espelage, and D. (2018). Peer victimization and suicidality among LGBTQ youth: The roles of school belonging, self-compassion, and parental support. Journal of LGBT Youth, 16(2), 134–156.https://doi.org/10.1080/19361653.2018.1543036
James, S. E., Herman, J. L., Rankin, S., Keisling, M., Mottet, L., & Anfi, M. (2016). The report of the 2015 U.S. transgender survey, national center for transgender equality. https://transequality.org/sites/default/files/docs/usts/USTS-Full-Report-Dec17.pdf
Kirchner, S., Till, B., Plöderl, M., & Niederkrotenthaler, T. (2022). Effects of “it gets better” suicide prevention videos on youth identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or other sexual or gender minorities: A randomized controlled trial. LGBT Health, 9(6), 436–446. https://doi-org.rlib.pace.edu/10.1089/lgbt.2021.0383
Nock, M. K., Green, J. G., Hwang, I., McLaughlin, K. A., Sampson, N. A., Zaslavsky, A. M., & Kessler, R. C. (2013). Prevalence, correlates, and treatment of lifetime suicidal behavior among adolescents: Results from the national comorbidity survey replication adolescent supplement (NCS-A). JAMA Psychiatry, 70(3), 1–24. 10.1001/2013.jamapsychiatry.55
Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. (2020, August). Mental Health and Mental Disorders. Mental Health and Mental Disorders – Healthy People 2030. https://health.gov/healthypeople/objectives-and-data/browse-objectives/mental-health-and-mental-disorders
Price, M. N., Green, A. E., DeChants, J. P., & Davis, C. K. (2023). Physical dating violence victimization among LGBTQ youth: Disclosure and association with mental health. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 38(15–16), 9059–9085. https://doi.org/10.1177/08862605231162655
Rhoades, H., Rusow, J. A., Bond, D., Lanteigne, A., Fulginiti, A., & Golbach, J. T. (2018). Homelessness, mental health and suicidality among LGBTQ youth accessing crisis services. Child Psychiatry & Human Development, 49(4) 643-651. https://doi.org/10.1007s10578-018-0780-1
Russon, J., Morrissey, J., Dellinger, J., Jin, B., & Diamond, G. (2022). Implementing attachment-based family therapy for depressed and suicidal adolescents and young adults in LGBTQ+ services: Feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness. Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention, 43(6), 500–507. https://doi-org.rlib.pace.edu/10.1027/0227-5910/a000821
Semborski, S., Srivastava, A., Rhoades, H., Fulginiti, A., & Goldbach, J. T. (2021). Burden,
belonging, and homelessness: Disclosure and social network differences among LGBTQ youth recruited from a suicide crisis service provider. Journal of Homosexuality, 69(5), 894–910. https://doi.org/10.1080/00918369.2021.1898801

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