ICTPMG613 Manage ICT Project Planning

ICTPMG613 Manage ICT Project Planning

ICTPMG613 Manage ICT Project Planning
Trainer’s Name: Assessment No: Task 1, Task 2
I declare that: I fully understand the context and purpose of this assessment.
I am fully aware of the competency standard/criteria against which I will be assessed.
I have been given fair notice of the date, time and venue for the assessment.
I am aware of the resources I need and how the assessment will be conducted.
I have had the appeals process and confidentiality explained to me.
I agree that I am ready to be assessed and that all written work is my own.
This assessment is my:
o First submission o Re-submission (Attempt )
Student Name: Student ID:
Student’s Signature: Submission Date: / /
ASSESSOR USE ONLY:
Result: Assessment Task 1: o Satisfactory o Not Satisfactory
Assessment Task 2: o Satisfactory o Not Satisfactory

Final Assessment Result for this unit C / NYC
Feedback: Feedback is given to the student on each
Assessment task & final outcome of the unit Yes / No
Assessor’s
Feedback:
Assessor’s
Signature: Date: / /
ASSESSMENT FIRST SUBMISSION/RE-SUBMISSION RECEIPT:
It is student’s responsibility to keep the assessment submission receipt as a proof of submission of assessment tasks
Student Name: Student ID:
Unit / Subject Code: Assessment No:
Trainer Name: Date: / /
Signature:
TYPES OF EVIDENCE
The RTO ensures that assessment is carried out in accordance with the requirements of the unit and the standards and will implement an assessment process which identifies the evidence required for each unit of competency. They will identify the type of evidence and the assessment methods used.
Types of evidence include:
Direct Evidence – things that the assessor, observes first-hand, e.g., observation or work samples
Indirect Evidence – things that someone else has observed and reported to us, e.g., third party reports
Supplementary Evidence – other things that can indicate performance, such as training records, questions, written work, portfolios
Assessment methods may include but are not limited to:
Written Activity
Case Study
Observation/Demonstration
Practical Activity
Questions
Third Party Report
Assessment must comply with the assessment methods of the training package and be conducted in accordance with the Principles of Assessment and assessment conditions. This means the assessment must be fair, flexible, reliable and valid.

ASSESSMENT INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS
Throughout your training we are committed to your learning by providing a training and assessment framework that ensures the knowledge gained through training is translated into practical on the job improvements.
You are going to be assessed for:
Your skills and knowledge using written and observation activities that apply to the workplace.
Your ability to apply your learning.
Your ability to recognise common principles and actively use these on the job.
All of your assessment and training is provided as a positive learning tool. Your assessor will guide your learning and provide feedback on your responses to the assessment materials until you have been deemed competent in this unit.
HOW YOU WILL BE ASSESSED
The process we follow is known as competency-based assessment. This means that evidence of your current skills and knowledge will be measured against national standards of best practice, not against the learning you have undertaken either recently or in the past. Some of the assessment will be concerned with how you apply your skills and knowledge in the workplace, and some in the training room as required by each unit.
The assessment tasks have been designed to enable you to demonstrate the required skills and knowledge and produce the critical evidence to successfully demonstrate competency at the required standard.
Your assessor will ensure that you are ready for assessment and will explain the assessment process. Your assessment tasks will outline the evidence to be collected and how it will be collected, for example; a written activity, case study, or demonstration and observation.
The assessor will also have determined if you have any special needs to be considered during assessment. Changes can be made to the way assessment is undertaken to account for special needs and this is called making Reasonable Adjustment.
What happens if your result is ‘Not Yet Competent’ for one or more assessment tasks?
Our assessment process is designed to answer the question “has the desired learning outcome been achieved yet?” If the answer is “Not yet”, then we work with you to see how we can get there.
In the case that one or more of your assessments has been marked ‘NYC’, your trainer will provide you with the necessary feedback and guidance, in order for you to resubmit your responses.
What if you disagree on the assessment outcome?
You can appeal against a decision made in regards to your assessment. An appeal should only be made if you have been assessed as ‘Not Yet Competent’ against a specific unit and you feel you have sufficient grounds to believe that you are entitled to be assessed as competent. You must be able to adequately demonstrate that you have the skills and experience to be able to meet the requirements of units you are appealing the assessment of.
Your trainer will outline the appeals process, which is available to the student. You can request a form to make an appeal and submit it to your trainer, the course coordinator, or the administration officer. The RTO will examine the appeal and you will be advised of the outcome within 14 days. Any additional information you wish to provide may be attached to the appeal form.
What if I believe I am already competent before training?
If you believe you already have the knowledge and skills to be able to demonstrate competence in this unit, speak with your trainer, as you may be able to apply for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL).
Assessor Responsibilities
Assessors need to be aware of their responsibilities and carry them out appropriately. To do this they need to:
Ensure that participants are assessed fairly based on the outcome of the language, literacy and numeracy review completed at enrolment.
Ensure that all documentation is signed by the student, trainer, workplace supervisor and assessor when units and certificates are complete, to ensure that there is no follow-up required from an administration perspective.
Ensure that their own qualifications are current.
When required, request the manager or supervisor to determine that the student is ‘satisfactorily’ demonstrating the requirements for each unit. ‘Satisfactorily’ means consistently meeting the standard expected from an experienced operator.
When required, ensure supervisors and students sign off on third party assessment forms or third party report.
Follow the recommendations from moderation and validation meetings.
How should I format my assessments?
Your assessments should be typed in a 11 or 12 size font for ease of reading. You must include a footer on each page with the student name, unit code and date. Your assessment needs to be submitted as a hardcopy or electronic copy as requested by your trainer.
How long should my answers be?
The length of your answers will be guided by the description in each assessment, for example:
Type of Answer Answer Guidelines
Short Answer 4 typed lines = 50 words, or
5 lines of handwritten text
Long Answer 8 typed lines = 100 words, or
10 lines of handwritten text = 1/3of a foolscap page
Brief Report 500 words = 1 page typed report, or
50 lines of handwritten text = 11/2foolscap handwritten pages
Mid Report 1,000 words = 2 page typed report
100 lines of handwritten text = 3 foolscap handwritten pages
Long Report 2,000 words = 4 page typed report
200 lines of handwritten text = 6 foolscap handwritten pages
How should I reference the sources of information I use in my assessments?
Include a reference list at the end of your work on a separate page. You should reference the sources you have used in your assessments in the Harvard Style. For example:
Website Name – Page or Document Name, Retrieved insert the date. Webpage link.
For a book: Author surname, author initial Year of publication, Title of book, Publisher, City, State

Assessment guide
The following table shows you how to achieve a satisfactory result against the criteria for each type of assessment task. The following is a list of general assessment methods that can be used in assessing a unit of competency. Check your assessment tasks to identify the ones used in this unit of competency.
Assessment Method Satisfactory Result Non-Satisfactory Result
You will receive an overall result of Competent or Not Yet Competent for the unit. The assessment process is made up of a number of assessment methods. You are required to achieve a satisfactory result in each of these to be deemed competent overall. Your assessment may include the following assessment types.
Questions All questions answered correctly Incorrect answers for one or more questions
Answers address the question in full; referring to appropriate sources from your workbook and/or workplace Answers do not address the question in full. Does not refer to appropriate or correct sources.
Third Party Report Supervisor or manager observes work performance and confirms that you consistently meet the standards expected from an experienced operator Could not demonstrate consistency. Could not demonstrate the ability to achieve the required standard
Written Activity The assessor will mark the activity against the detailed guidelines/instructions Does not follow guidelines/instructions
Attachments if requested are attached Requested supplementary items are not attached
All requirements of the written activity are addressed/covered. Response does not address the requirements in full; is missing a response for one or more areas.
Responses must refer to appropriate sources from your workbook and/or workplace One or more of the requirements are answered incorrectly.
Does not refer to or utilise appropriate or correct sources of information
Observation/Demonstration All elements, criteria, knowledge and performance evidence and critical aspects of evidence, are demonstrated at the appropriate AQF level Could not demonstrate elements, criteria, knowledge and performance evidence and/or critical aspects of evidence, at the appropriate AQF level
Case Study All comprehension questions answered correctly; demonstrating an application of knowledge of the topic case study. Lack of demonstrated comprehension of the underpinning knowledge (remove) required to complete the case study questions correctly. One or more questions are answered incorrectly.
Answers address the question in full; referring to appropriate sources from your workbook and/or workplace Answers do not address the question in full; do not refer to appropriate sources.
Practical Activity All tasks in the practical activity must be competed and evidence of completion must be provided to your trainer/assessor.
All tasks have been completed accurately and evidence provided for each stated task. Tasks have not been completed effectively and evidence of completion has not been provided.
Attachments if requested are attached Requested supplementary items are not attached
Assessment Plan
The student must be assessed as satisfactory in each of the following assessment methods in order to demonstrate competence in a variety of ways.
Evidence number/ Task number Assessment method/ Type of evidence/ Task name Sufficient evidence recorded/Outcome
Assessment task 1 Knowledge Test (KT) S / NS (First Attempt)
S / NS (Second Attempt)
Assessment task 2 Practical Tasks (PT) S / NS (First Attempt)
S / NS (Second Attempt)
Outcome C ? NYC ?
Date assessed:
Trainer signature:
Completion of the Assessment Plan
Your trainer is required to fill out the Assessment Plan Outcome records above, when:
You have completed and submitted all the requirements for the assessment tasks for this cluster or unit of competency.
Your work has been reviewed and assessed by your trainer/assessor.
You have been assessed as either satisfactory or unsatisfactory for each assessment task within the unit of competency.
You have been provided with relevant and detailed feedback.
Every assessment has a “Feedback to Student” section used to record the following information. Your trainer/assessor must also ensure that all sections are filled in appropriately, such as:
Result of Assessment (satisfactory or unsatisfactory)
Student name, signature and date
Assessor name, signature and date
Relevant and detailed feedback
Unit Requirements
You, the student, must read and understand all of the information in the Unit Requirements before completing the Student Pack. If you have any questions regarding the information, see your trainer/assessor for further information and clarification.
Knowledge Test (Written Tasks)
1. What is project planning?
2. What is a project plan?
3. What is IT project management?
4. What is an agile methodology? When can it be used?
5. What is Kanban?
6. What is the purpose of Mura in a Lean methodology?
7. What are the advantages and disadvantages of the PRINCE2 method?
Advantages
Disadvantages
8. The key factor to determine the right methodology is the type of project or process that you manage. With a vast array of frameworks and methodologies, narrowing down the approach based on specific criteria is critical. What factors can these include (list five).
9. What Does Tailoring Mean?
10. What are the uses and purposes of Work Breakdown Structures (WBS)?
11. What does effort mean?
12. What does duration mean?
13. What is scheduling in project management?
14. How is project scheduling different from planning?
15. What Is a Work Package in Project Management?
16. Why Is Project Schedule Control Important?
17. What’s the outcome of schedule control and monitoring?
18. A software company has developed a software in the mainframe. However, the customer wanted few other features which are not possible with a mainframe. A software company couldn’t accommodate them with the existing software developed using the mainframe, hence with the customer approval they started a fresh project using JAVA. The costs spent for the mainframe project are:
(a) Variable
(b) Direct
(c) Indirect
(d) Sunk
19. To prevent your project from over budget, which of the following needs to be done in the planning stage of the project?
(a) Allocating extra time for every activity in the schedule
(b) Allocating extra cost for all the activities
(c) Allocating extra cost buffer for high-risk activities
(d) Provide extra time for each activity in the schedule
20. In Three-point estimating techniques, what are the three points referring?
(a) Planned, Actual, Approximate
(b) Optimistic, Pessimistic, Most likely
(c) Optimistic, Pessimistic, Actual
(d) Historical, Actual, Planned
21. What are the challenges of cost management?
22. What is a project budget?
Assessment Outcome
Question Correct (?)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
Assessed by _________________________ Assessor Signature_______________ Date _________

Skills Assessment (Practical Tasks)
ASSESSOR NOTE
These instructions must be followed when assessing the student in this unit. The checklist on the following page is to be completed for each student. Please refer to separate mapping document for specific details relating to alignment of this task to the unit requirements.
This competency is to be assessed using standard and authorised work practices, safety requirements and environmental constraints.
Assessment of essential underpinning knowledge will usually be conducted in an off-site context.
Assessment is to comply with relevant regulatory or Australian standards’ requirements.
Resource implications for assessment include:
• an induction procedure and requirement
• realistic tasks or simulated tasks covering the mandatory task requirements
• relevant specifications and work instructions
• tools and equipment appropriate to applying safe work practices
• support materials appropriate to activity
• workplace instructions relating to safe work practices and addressing hazards and emergencies
• material safety data sheets
• research resources, including industry related systems information.
Reasonable adjustments for people with disabilities must be made to assessment processes where required. This could include access to modified equipment and other physical resources, and the provision of appropriate assessment support.
What happens if your result is ‘Not Yet Competent’ for one or more assessment tasks?
The assessment process is designed to answer the question “has the participant satisfactorily demonstrated competence yet?” If the answer is “Not yet”, then we work with you to see how we can get there.
In the case that one or more of your assessments has been marked ‘NYC’, your Trainer will provide you with the necessary feedback and guidance, in order for you to resubmit/redo your assessment task(s).
What if you disagree on the assessment outcome?
You can appeal against a decision made in regards to an assessment of your competency. An appeal should only be made if you have been assessed as ‘Not Yet Competent’ against specific competency standards and you feel you have sufficient grounds to believe that you are entitled to be assessed as competent.
You must be able to adequately demonstrate that you have the skills and experience to be able to meet the requirements of the unit you are appealing against the assessment of.
You can request a form to make an appeal and submit it to your Trainer, the Course Coordinator, or an Administration Officer. The RTO will examine the appeal and you will be advised of the outcome within 14 days. Any additional information you wish to provide may be attached to the form.
What if I believe I am already competent before training?
If you believe you already have the knowledge and skills to be able to demonstrate competence in this unit, speak with your Trainer, as you may be able to apply for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL).
Credit Transfer
Credit transfer is recognition for study you have already completed. To receive Credit Transfer, you must be enrolled in the relevant program. Credit Transfer can be granted if you provide the RTO with certified copies of your qualifications, a Statement of Attainment or a Statement of Results along with Credit Transfer Application Form. (For further information please visit Credit Transfer Policy)

Task 1 – ICT Project Plan 1 – Automated payroll system with GPS tracking and image capture
Your organisation is undertaking the development of a new software product – Automated payroll system with GPS tracking and image capture. You are required to develop a project plan for the development of the product.
This automated payroll system doubles up as a web and Android application – while the user will use the Android interface, the Admin (usually the HR) will use the web interface.
The application will work something like this – each employee is given an employee ID and password for accessing the app from their Android device. When an employee logs into the system from an Android device and immediately, the user image is captured. Then, the system sends the user image and their GPS location to the Admin.
As long as the user stays logged into the system via an Android device, the GPS location will continue to be automatically updated and forwarded to the Admin every five minutes. When the user logs out, their image and GPS location are again sent to the Admin.
This application allows Admins to keep track of employee attendance and payroll. The Admin creates employee profiles for each employee by entering all the relevant personal information (name, job position, qualification, etc.). They can also check the salary details and breakdown of the salary of each employee by entering the employee ID and date.
Since the application is GPS-enabled, no employee can add proxy attendance. This enables the HRs to keep an accurate record of working days of individual employees and tweak their payroll accordingly.
Step 1: Project Goals
A project is successful when it has met the needs of the stakeholders. A stakeholder is anybody directly, or indirectly impacted by the project.
As a first step, it is important to identify the stakeholders in your project. It is not always easy to determine the stakeholders of a project, particularly those impacted indirectly. Examples of stakeholders are:
The project sponsors
The customer who receives the deliverables
The users of the project output
The project manager and project team
Once you understand who the stakeholders are, the next step is to find out their needs. The best way to do this is by conducting stakeholder interviews. Take time during the interviews to draw out the requirements that create real benefits. Sometimes stakeholders will talk about needs that aren’t relevant and don’t deliver benefits. These can be recorded and set as a low priority.
The next step, once you have conducted all the interviews and have a comprehensive list of needs is to prioritise them. From the prioritised list, create a set of easily measurable goals. A good technique for doing this is to review them against the SMART principle. This way, the achievement of the goal will be easy to identify.
Once you have established a clear set of goals, they should be recorded in the project plan. It can be useful also to include the needs and expectations of your stakeholders.
Now you have completed the most difficult part of the planning process; it’s time to move on and look at the project deliverables.
Step 2: Project Deliverables
Using the goals, you have defined in step 1, create a list of things the project needs to deliver to meet those goals. Specify when and how to deliver each item.
Add the deliverables to the project plan with an estimated delivery date. You will establish more accurate delivery dates during the scheduling phase, which is next.
Step 3: Project Schedule
Create a list of tasks that need to be carried out for each deliverable identified in step 2. For each task determine the following:
The amount of effort (hours or days) required for completing the task
The resource who will carry out the task
Once you have established the amount of effort for each task, you can work out the effort required for each deliverable, and an accurate delivery date. Update your deliverables section with the more precise delivery dates.
At this point in the planning, you could choose to use a software package such as Microsoft Project to create your project schedule. Alternatively, use one of the many free templates available. Input all of the deliverables, tasks, durations and the resources who will complete each task.
A common problem discovered at this point is when you have an imposed delivery deadline from the sponsor that is not realistic based on your estimates. If you discover this is the case, you must contact the sponsor immediately. The options you have in this situation are:
Renegotiate the deadline (project delay)
Employ additional resources (increased cost)
Reduce the scope of the project (less delivered)
Use the project schedule to justify pursuing one of these options.
Step 4: Supporting Plans
This section deals with the plans you should create as part of the planning process. These can be included directly in the plan.
Human Resource Plan
Identify, by name, the individuals and organisations with a leading role in the project. For each, describe their roles and responsibilities on the project.
Next, specify the number and type of people needed to carry out the project. For each resource detail start dates, the estimated duration and the method you will use for obtaining them.
Create a single sheet containing this information.
Communications Plan
Create a document showing who is to be kept informed about the project and how they will receive the information. The most common mechanism is a weekly or monthly status report, describing how the project is performing, milestones achieved and the work you’ve planned for the next period.
Risk Management Plan
Risk management is an important part of project management. Although often overlooked, it is important to identify as many risks to your project as possible and be prepared if something bad happens.
Here are some examples of common project risks:
Time and cost estimate too optimistic
Customer review and feedback cycle too slow
Unexpected budget cuts
Unclear roles and responsibilities
No stakeholder input obtained
Not clearly understanding stakeholder needs
Stakeholders changing requirements after the project has started
Stakeholders adding new requirements after the project has started
Poor communication resulting in misunderstandings, quality problems and rework
Lack of resource commitment
Risks can be tracked using a simple risk log. Add each risk you have identified to your risk log; write down what you will do in the event it occurs, and what you will do to prevent it from happening. Review your risk log on a regular basis, adding new risks as they occur during the life of the project. Remember, if you ignore risks, they don’t go away.
In developing the project plan, a range of tools should be utilized such as:
Work breakdown structure
As its name suggests, a work breakdown structure (WBS) is a project management tool that breaks down large projects into more manageable sections. It defines the project’s deliverables and provides a visual decomposition of the project’s scope.
The WBS is created with the team first identifying the major deliverables, and then breaking those deliverables down into smaller, more digestible bits until they can be assigned as tasks to members of the team.
Network diagrams
A project management network diagram graphically represents the project’s tasks and workflow. It lays out the project’s schedule and sequence of activities, and uses boxes and arrows to connect work segments and illustrate the dependencies between tasks.
Gantt chart
A Gantt chart is a visual snapshot of the different project management activities on a timeline. A bar represents each activity, with the location and length of the bar signifying the start and end dates and duration of the activity.
A quick glance at a Gantt chart will let you know right away the start and end dates of the entire project, what the project’s activities are, each activity’s start and end date, how long they’re scheduled for, and if there are any overlapping activities to be mindful of.

Observation Checklist
Observation Criteria S NS
Developed and documented project management plan according to organisational requirements
Developed and documented management sub-plans
Lodged documents according to organisational policies and procedures
Assessed models of project management according to organisational requirements
Assessed product development approach
Selected project management and systems development methodology
Tailored and documented methodologies to solution requirements
Lodged documentation according to organisational policies and procedures
Developed project component breakdown according to project requirements
Estimated project effort and duration
Created project schedule and documented according to organisational policies and procedures
Developed and allocate work packages
Established schedule controls for monitoring project schedule
Identified areas of anticipated project spend
Determined dollar amounts and timing of cash flows
Developed and documented project budget based on anticipated expenditure and cash flow
Established controls for monitoring budget
Outcome
? Satisfactory ? Unsatisfactory
Comments:
Task 2 – ICT Project Plan 2 – Product Lifecycle Management System
Your organisation is preparing a project plan for to undertake the project for the Bureau of Meteorology as outlined in the attached scope of requirements . You have been tasked with developing and documenting logical processes and timelines to ensure that the project is delivered according to organisational and stakeholder expectations, and in order to do so, you must:
select methodologies
develop project schedules
develop project budgets
establish budgetary controls.
A full project plan, including sub-plans must be developed. Sub-plans can include:
communications
human resource
organisational change
project implementation procurement quality
risk
scope
change control.
At a minimum, a project plan answers basic questions about the project:
Why? – What is the problem or value proposition addressed by the project? Why is it being sponsored?
What? – What is the work that will be performed on the project? What are the major products/deliverables?
Who? – Who will be involved and what will be their responsibilities within the project? How will they be organized?
When? – What is the project timeline and when will particularly meaningful points, referred to as milestones, be complete?
The project plan document may include the following sections:
Introduction: A high-level overview of the project.
Project Management Approach: The roles and authority of team members. It represents the executive summary of the Project Management Plan.
Project Scope: The scope statement from the Project charter should be used as a starting point with more details about what the project includes and what it does not include (In-Scope and Out-Of-Scope).
Milestone List: A list of the project Milestones (the stop points that helps evaluating the progress of the project). This list includes the milestone name, a description about the milestone, and the date expected.
Schedule Baseline and Work Breakdown Structure: WBS which consists of Work Packages and WBS Dictionary, which defines these work packages, as well as Schedule Baseline, which is the reference point for managing project progress, are included here.
Project Management Plans: This section contains all management plans of all project aspects.
Change Management Plan
Communication Management Plan
Cost Management Plan
Procurement Management Plan
Project Scope Management Plan
Schedule Management Plan
Quality Management Plan
Risk Management Plan
HR/Staffing Management Plan
Resource Calendar: Identify key resources needed for the project and their times and durations of need.
Cost Baseline: This section includes the budgeted total of each phase of the project and comments about the cost.
Quality Baseline: Acceptable levels of quality.
Sponsor Acceptance: Some space for the project sponsor to sign off the document.

Observation Checklist
Observation Criteria S NS
Developed and documented project management plan according to organisational requirements
Developed and documented management sub-plans
Lodged documents according to organisational policies and procedures
Assessed models of project management according to organisational requirements
Assessed product development approach
Selected project management and systems development methodology
Tailored and documented methodologies to solution requirements
Lodged documentation according to organisational policies and procedures
Developed project component breakdown according to project requirements
Estimated project effort and duration
Created project schedule and documented according to organisational policies and procedures
Developed and allocate work packages
Established schedule controls for monitoring project schedule
Identified areas of anticipated project spend
Determined dollar amounts and timing of cash flows
Developed and documented project budget based on anticipated expenditure and cash flow
Established controls for monitoring budget
Outcome
? Satisfactory ? Unsatisfactory
Comments:

Default image
admin
Articles: 32872

Quick Quote

QUICK QUOTE

Approximately 250 words